19. Friction and Wear of Carbon Brake Materials

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. John A. Tanner and
  2. Matt Travis

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch19

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Tanner, J. A. and Travis, M. (2005) Friction and Wear of Carbon Brake Materials, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch19

Author Information

  1. The Boeing Company PO Box 3707 Seattle, Washington 98124–2207

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • dynamometer;
  • information;
  • carbon;
  • oxygen;
  • environment

Summary

A literature review has been undertaken to establish what information on carbon friction and wear has been generated from past research activities. These past research activities have been summarized, and their results have been compared with subscale dynamometer test results.

Water vapor in the atmosphere produces a direct lubricant effect on carbon. Observed transition temperatures within the range of 140°C to 200°C, associated with increases in friction and wear of carbon brake materials are attributed to water vapor desorption. Friction and wear transitions in the range of 500°C to 900°C may be associated with oxygen desorption.