21. Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Boron Carbide Friction Materials

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Robert J. Shinavski1 and
  2. Peter Filip2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch21

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Shinavski, R. J. and Filip, P. (2005) Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Boron Carbide Friction Materials, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch21

Author Information

  1. 1

    Kuo-Chiang Wang Hyper-Therm HTC, Inc. 18411 Gothard Street, Units A, B & C Huntington Beach, CA 92648

  2. 2

    Tod Policandriotes Center for Advanced Friction Studies Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • composites;
  • tempemture;
  • microstructure;
  • ceramic;
  • materials

Summary

Ceramic matrix composites are being examined as an alternative to carbon/carbon (C/C) for high performance aircraft brake friction applications. In particular, carbon fiber-reinforced boron carbide (C/B4C) is of interest for next generation heat sinks due to its higher volumetric heat capacity. Composites were fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration processing of boron carbide into carbon fiber preforms. Thermal and mechanical properties of the resulting composites were then characterized. The effect of elevated temperature exposure, such as would be experienced during use as an aircraft brake friction material, was examined with regards to the stability of the composite microstructure and the effect of the heat treatments on the composite properties.

Tribological properties were evaluated on sub-scale specimens at scaled energy conditions similar to an F-16 aircraft brake. Very low wear rates were measured at low rates of energy dissipation. Significantly higher wear rates resulted at higher rates of energy dissipation. Finite element modeling supports a thermal origin of the observed behavior.