22. Thermal Shock Impact on C/C and Si Melt Infiltrated C/C Materials (SIMI)

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Dale E. Wittmer and
  2. Peter Filip

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch22

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Wittmer, D. E. and Filip, P. (2005) Thermal Shock Impact on C/C and Si Melt Infiltrated C/C Materials (SIMI), in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch22

Author Information

  1. Southern Illinois University 1230 Lincoln Drive-MS6603 Carbondale, IL 62901

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • materials;
  • dynamometer;
  • composite;
  • temperature;
  • moisture

Summary

Wear of carbon-carbon materials for use in brake systems is a product of many dimensions. In operation, brakes see very high temperatures and are subject to high thermal shocking loads. This investigation deals with a baseline a commercial pitch fiber/charred resin matrix/CVI carbon/carbon (C/C) composite and the same composite infiltrated with silicon by melt infiltration (SiMI). The objectives of this work were to explain the improved frictional performance and fracture resistance of the SiMI materials, following the thermal shocking experiments, and compare their behavior to that of the commercial C/C composite.

Friction properties and wear were determined following sub-scale dynamometer testing of disc on disc, where the testing conditions were dry (5 to 18% relative humidity) or wet (>50% relative humidity). Different energy levels were used as a proportion of normal landing energy (NLE), with three taxi and one landing sequence per cycle. A total of 50 cycles were run on each disc pair.

The results showed that the SiMI materials had higher and more stable coefficient of friction (μ) than the C/C composite; however there was more oscillation in μ and more noise related to the SiMI materials compared with the C/C. In addition, the SiMI process eliminated the sensitivity to moisture.