26. Design and Reliability of Ceramics: Do Modelers, Designers, and Fractographers See the Same World?

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. George David Quinn

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch26

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Quinn, G. D. (2005) Design and Reliability of Ceramics: Do Modelers, Designers, and Fractographers See the Same World?, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch26

Author Information

  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Bureau Drive Gaithersburg, MD, 20899–8529

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • laboratory;
  • monolithic;
  • components;
  • mechanisms;
  • parameters

Summary

Techniques for design and reliability analyses of structural ceramic components are now well established. Laboratory test coupon data are used in design codes to predict the fast fracture and time dependent reliability of monolithic or dispersed-phase ceramic composite components. Fractographic analysis of fractured components shows that there can be surprises, however. A few case studies are reviewed to show that components often fail from an unanticipated cause. The reliability models make a number of assumptions that, if violated, put the predictions at risk.