33. Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Elizabeth Opila

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch33

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Opila, E. (2005) Characterizing the Chemical Stability of High Temperature Materials for Application in Extreme Environments, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch33

Author Information

  1. NASA Glenn Research Center 21000 Brookpark Rd. Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • environments;
  • combustion;
  • thermodynamic;
  • velocity;
  • hydrocarbon

Summary

The chemical stability of high temperature materials must be known for use in the extreme environments of combustion applications. The characterization techniques available at NASA Glenn Research Center vary from fundamental thermodynamic property determination to material durability testing in actual engine environments. In this paper some of the unique techniques and facilities available at NASA Glenn will be reviewed. Multiple cell Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry is used to determine thermodynamic data by sampling gas species formed by reaction or equilibration in a Knudsen cell held in a vacuum. The transpiration technique can also be used to determine thermodynamic data of volatile species but at atmospheric pressures. Thermodynamic data in the Si-O-H(g) system were determined with this technique. Free Jet Sampling Mass Spectrometry can be used to study gas-solid interactions at a pressure of one atmosphere. Volatile Si(OH)4(g) was identified by this mass spectrometry technique. A High Pressure Burner Rig is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrocarbon-fueled combustion environments. Silicon carbide (SiC) volatility rates were measured in the burner rig as a function of total pressure, gas velocity and temperature. Finally, the Research Combustion Lab Rocket Test Cell is used to expose high temperature materials in hydrogen/oxygen rocket engine environments to assess material durability. SiC recession due to rocket engine exposures was measured as a function of oxidant/fuel ratio, temperature, and total pressure. The emphasis of the discussion for all techniques will be placed on experimental factors that must be controlled for accurate acquisition of results and reliable prediction of high temperature material chemical stability.