35. Mechanical Behavior Characterization of a Thin Ceramic Substrate at Elevated Temperature Using a Stereo-Imaging Technique

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Sujanto Widjaja1,
  2. Karen L. Geisinger2 and
  3. Scott C. Pollard3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch35

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Widjaja, S., Geisinger, K. L. and Pollard, S. C. (2005) Mechanical Behavior Characterization of a Thin Ceramic Substrate at Elevated Temperature Using a Stereo-Imaging Technique, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch35

Author Information

  1. 1

    Corning Incorporated Science & Technology Division, SP-FR-04 Corning, NY 14831

  2. 2

    Coming Incorporated Science & Technology Division, SP-FR-04 Corning, NY 14831

  3. 3

    Corning Incorporated Science & Technology Division, SP-AR-02 Corning, NY 14831

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • zirconia;
  • deformation;
  • photogrammetric;
  • ceramic;
  • temperatures

Summary

High temperature mechanical behaviors of a thin ceramic substrate of 3%yttria-stabilized zirconia (3YSZ) were characterized using ARAMIS® optical measurement system (GOM Optical Measuring Techniques, Braunschweig, Germany). The technique relies on 3D image correlation photogrammetric principles providing non-contact determination of shape, deformation and full-field strain. Experimentally, a random pattern with good contrast was applied to the surface of a thin substrate, and the deformation of substrate under load was recorded and evaluated using digital image processing. The elastic modulus of the ceramic substrate at room temperature and 725°C was indirectly calculated from the deflection data, and generally it was found to be in agreement with values reported elsewhere. This characterization technique also allows the determination of the maximum value of deflection of the substrate at failure during pressure rupture testing and in-situ observation of ceramic membrane response under temperatures.