38. Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Janet Hurst1,
  2. David Hull1 and
  3. Daniel Gorican2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch38

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Hurst, J., Hull, D. and Gorican, D. (2005) Synthesis of Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Engineering Applications, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch38

Author Information

  1. 1

    NASA Glenn Research Center 21000 Brookpark Rd Cleveland, Ohio 44135

  2. 2

    QSS Group 21000 Brookpark Rd Cleveland, Ohio 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

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Keywords:

  • carbon;
  • thermal;
  • electronic;
  • nitride;
  • nanotubes

Summary

Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNT) are of significant interest to the scientific and technical communities for many of the same reasons that carbon nanotubes (CNT) have attracted wide attention. Both materials have potentially unique and important properties for structural and electronic applications. However of even more consequence than their similarities may be the complementary differences between carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. While BNNT possess a very high modulus similar to CNT, they also possess superior chemical and thermal stability. Additionally, BNNT have more uniform electronic properties, with a uniform band gap of 5.5 eV while CNT vary from semi-conductive to highly conductive behavior.

Boron nitride nanotubes have been synthesized both in the literature and at NASA Glenn Research Center, by a variety of methods such as chemical vapor deposition, arc discharge and reactive milling. Consistent large scale production of a reliable product has proven to be difficult. Progress in the reproducible synthesis of 1–2 gram sized batches of boron nitride nanotubes will be discussed as well as potential uses for this unique material.