6. Controlling Microstructural Anisotropy During Forming

  1. Manuel E. Brito,
  2. Peter Filip,
  3. Charles Lewinsohn,
  4. Ali Sayir,
  5. Mark Opeka and
  6. William M. Mullins
  1. Shawn M. Nycz and
  2. Richard A. Haber

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch6

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8

How to Cite

Nycz, S. M. and Haber, R. A. (2008) Controlling Microstructural Anisotropy During Forming, in Developments in Advanced Ceramics and Composites: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 26, Number 8 (eds M. E. Brito, P. Filip, C. Lewinsohn, A. Sayir, M. Opeka and W. M. Mullins), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291283.ch6

Author Information

  1. Rutgers University Ceramic and Materials Engineering 98 Brett Rd. Piscataway, NJ 08854–8065

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2005

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9781574982619

Online ISBN: 9780470291283

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • anisometric;
  • aluminum;
  • anisotropy;
  • micrographs;
  • analogous

Summary

Microstructural anisotropy is a key feature in the control of specific properties of low thermal expansion ceramics. A study has been conducted that quantifies the particle orientation for anisometric particles when subjected to a shear in a fluid/paste. The preferential orientation which remains in a green body after processing can affect the tendency to crack during drying and firing, differential shrinkage and warpage, as well as a multitude of physical properties such as strength and density. An optical method was developed which reveals details about the preferred orientation that exists in thin samples. This technique was applied to aluminum oxide green bodies to determine orientation which was affected by experimentally varying rheology, solids loading, and shear rate. Computational fluid dynamics software was used to model the shear helds present in the experimental fluid during forming. Results show that microstructural anisotropy can be varied throughout a formed part by controlling cross-sectional dimensions and forming parameters.