Chapter 12. Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Jennifer Cerny1 and
  2. Gregory Morscher2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch12

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Cerny, J. and Morscher, G. (2006) Adhesive Bonding of Titanium to Carbon-Carbon Composites for Heat Rejection Systems, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch12

Author Information

  1. 1

    QSS Group, Inc., FNASA Glenn Research Center Ceramics Branch. Materials Division 21000 Brookpark Road Cleveland, OH 44135

  2. 2

    Ohio Aerospace Institute, FNASA Glenn Research Center Ceramics Branch. Materials Division 21000 Brookpark Road Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE);
  • adhesive;
  • conductivity;
  • carbon;
  • polyimide

Summary

High temperature adhesives with good thermal conductivity, mechanical performance, and long term durability are crucial for the assembly of heat rejection system components for space exploration missions. In the present study, commercially available adhesives were used to bond high conductivity carbon–carbon composites to titanium sheets. Bonded pieces were also exposed to high (530 to 600 Kelvin for 24 hours) and low (liquid nitrogen 77K for 15 minutes) temperatures to evaluate the integrity of the bonds. Results of the microstructural characterization and tensile shear strengths of bonded specimens will be reported. The effect of titanium surface roughness on the interface microstructure will also be discussed.