Chapter 15. Brazing of Ceramic-Matrix Composites to Titanium Using Metallic Glass Interlayers

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. R. Asthana,
  2. M. Singh and
  3. T. P. Shpargel

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch15

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Asthana, R., Singh, M. and Shpargel, T. P. (2008) Brazing of Ceramic-Matrix Composites to Titanium Using Metallic Glass Interlayers, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch15

Author Information

  1. Department of Engineering & Technology University of Wisconsin–Stout Menomonie, WI 54751

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • ceramic-matrix;
  • chemical vapor infiltrated;
  • timet;
  • isothermally;
  • microhardness

Summary

Bonding and assembly of ceramic–matrix composites is an enabling technology for applications in a number of aerospace and ground–based systems. In this study, three types of composites (C–C, C–SiC, and SiC–SiC) were brazed to titanium metal using amorphous Ni–base metglass (MBF–20 and MBF–30) braze foils. The SEM and EDS examination of the joints showed that chemical dissolution and interdiffusion led to compositional changes and second phase precipitation which aided metallurgical bonding. Evidence of interlamellar shear failure along the weak BN coatings on SiC fibers was noted in some composites but the brazed joints were crack–free. Residual stresses led to hardness gradients across the joint with peak microhardness (Knoop) as high as 1310 KHN; stress accommodation by the ductile brazes seems to have prevented interfacial cracking.