Chapter 31. Max-Phases Investigated by Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Martin Magnuson

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch31

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Magnuson, M. (2006) Max-Phases Investigated by Soft X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch31

Author Information

  1. Department of Physics, Uppsala University P. O. Box 530, S–75121 Uppsala, Sweden

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • nanolaminated;
  • aluminides;
  • hybridization;
  • bandstructure;
  • parallel

Summary

The electronic structures of the MAX–phases Ti3AlC2, Ti3SiC2 and Ti3GeC2 were investigated by soft X–ray emission spectroscopy. These nanolaminated carbide compounds represent a class of layered materials with a combination of properties from both metals and ceramics. The bulk–sensitive soft X–ray emission technique is shown to be particularly useful for detecting detailed electronic structure information about internal monolayers and interfaces. A weak covalent Ti–Al bond is manifested by a pronounced shoulder in the Ti L–emission of Ti3AlC2. When Al is replaced by Si or Ge, the shoulder disappears. Furthermore, the spectral shapes of Al, Si and Ge in the MAX–phases are strongly modified in comparison to the corresponding pure elements. By varying the constituting elements, a change of the electron population is achieved causing a change of covalent bonding between the laminated layers, which enables control of the macroscopic properties of the material.