Chapter 37. The CVI-Process : State of the Art and Perspective

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Roger Naslain,
  2. Francis Langlais,
  3. Gerard Vignoles and
  4. Rene Pailler

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch37

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Naslain, R., Langlais, F., Vignoles, G. and Pailler, R. (2006) The CVI-Process : State of the Art and Perspective, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch37

Author Information

  1. LCTS, University Bordeaux 1 3 Alléee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac, France

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • densification;
  • infiltrability;
  • phenomena;
  • constituents;
  • nlicrotexture

Summary

Chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) is used to produce ceramic matrix composites starting from a multidirectional fiber preform and gaseous precursors of the constituents. The fundamentals of the process in terms of preform pore network, transport phenomena, chemistry, nature of the deposit and gaseous reaction by–products, are depicted. The advantages and drawbacks of the basic version of CVI (I–CVI) are presented and briefly discussed. Related versions, designed to increase the deposition rate and shorten the densification time (TO–CVI, F–CVI, LV–CVI) or to tailor the interphase and matrix microstructure (P–CVI), are comparatively discussed. Finally, new developments and perspectives are presented.