Chapter 40. Ceramic Foam Processing by the Chemical Vapor Infiltration of a Graphite Felt with Sic for Ceramic Composite Applications

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Kevin A. Arpin,
  2. Christopher Hill,
  3. Justin W. Reutenauer,
  4. Timothy P. Coons,
  5. Michael A. Kmetz and
  6. Steven L. Suib

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch40

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Arpin, K. A., Hill, C., Reutenauer, J. W., Coons, T. P., Kmetz, M. A. and Suib, S. L. (2006) Ceramic Foam Processing by the Chemical Vapor Infiltration of a Graphite Felt with Sic for Ceramic Composite Applications, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch40

Author Information

  1. Department of Chemistry University of Connecticut 55 North Eagleville Road Storrs, Connecticut 06269

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • silicon carbide (Sic);
  • chemical vapor infiltration (CVI);
  • polymer impregnation pyrolysis (PIP);
  • oxidized;
  • methytrichlorosilane

Summary

This investigation focuses on the fabrication of fibrous silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic foams by the Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI) of SiC into a low cost graphite felt. Selected foams were then oxidized to produce foams consisting of hollow SiC fibers. Depending on infiltration time, densities from 0.3 to 1.0 g/cm3 were obtained (0.268 to 0.925 g/cm3 after oxidation). Compressive strength data (pre and post oxidized foams) and flexural strength data (post oxidized foams) are presented as a function of density. This unique ceramic foam with high temperature capabilities and reasonable compressive and flexural strengths was also used as a light weight core in the development of a sandwich composite structure. Coated Nicalon 4–ply laminates were used as faceplates. The composite processing included both Polymer Impregnation Pyrolysis (PIP) and the CVI of the final laminate–foam structure with a SiC overcoat. Overall composite flexural strengths are reported with respect to the bulk density of the foam core and the composite. Relatively small, 1.5 × 10 × 0.5 cm, sandwich type composites were successfully produced and possibly represent a lightweight structure for high temperature (>1000°C) applications.