Chapter 52. Static Fatigue (SCG) Models and Test Methods for Dense Ceramics

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Michael G. Jenkins1,
  2. Jonathan A. Salem2 and
  3. Kristin Breder3

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch52

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Jenkins, M. G., Salem, J. A. and Breder, K. (2006) Static Fatigue (SCG) Models and Test Methods for Dense Ceramics, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch52

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Detroit Mercy Department of Mechanical Engineering 4001 W McNichols Road Detroit, MI 48221 USA

  2. 2

    NASA–Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field 21000 Brookpark Road Cleveland, OH 44135 USA

  3. 3

    Saint–Gobain Abrasives Higgins Grinding Technology Center Worcester, MA 01615 SA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • susceptibility;
  • slow crack growth (SCG);
  • astm;
  • predictions;
  • noteworthy

Summary

Long–term durability of dense ceramics in clean energy applications depends on the material's susceptibility to slow crack growth (SCG) in various environments and temperatures. Typically, the SCG behaviour is described in terms of a v–K diagram which establishes the relationship between the applied stress intensity factor, K, and the crack growth velocity, v, in a given environment. Various models have been employed to describe this v–K behaviour with varying degrees of success. For example, the power law relation is commonly applied as an average of various stages of SCG behaviour. However, other models (e.g., fracture mechanics, exponential, etc) have been employed with mixed results. In this paper, the applicability of v–K SCG models (in addition power law) is reviewed. Issues related to mathematical form of the model, a priori assumptions and predictive utility are examined. In addition, a recently approved full–consensus ASTM test method standard for determining the static fatigue behaviour and relevancy of SCG models is presented and discussed.

SUMMARY/CONCLUSIONS