Chapter 55. Life Limiting Behavior of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides at Intermediate Temperature for Stirling Convertor Applications

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Sung R. Choi and
  2. David L. Krause

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch55

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Choi, S. R. and Krause, D. L. (2006) Life Limiting Behavior of Two Gas-Turbine Grade Silicon Nitrides at Intermediate Temperature for Stirling Convertor Applications, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch55

Author Information

  1. NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • stirling;
  • silicon;
  • specimens;
  • slow crack growth (SCG);
  • ceramics

Summary

As a series of material approaches to the development of advanced technology for Stirling converters for space power applications, two commercial, structural silicon nitrides AS800 and SN282 were downselected. Their life limiting property was characterized through slow crack growth testing in flexure at an intermediate temperature of 1050 °C in air. AS800 exhibited both fast–fracture strength and Weibull modulus greater than SN282. However, life limiting phenomenon was apparent in AS800 with a low slow crack growth parameter n = 15; whereas, a much increased resistance to slow crack growth (n >150) was found in SN282. The life limiting property of both silicon nitrides was found to be consistent either in dynamic fatigue (constant stress–rate) loading or in stress rupture (constant stress or static fatigue).