Chapter 61. The Frictional Performance of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials in the Presence of Hydraulic Fluid, Runway Deicer Agent, Aircraft Deicer Agent and Sea-Salt Water

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Milan Krkoska,
  2. Katarzyna Peszynska-Bialczyk and
  3. Peter Filip

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch61

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Krkoska, M., Peszynska-Bialczyk, K. and Filip, P. (2006) The Frictional Performance of Carbon-Carbon Composite Materials in the Presence of Hydraulic Fluid, Runway Deicer Agent, Aircraft Deicer Agent and Sea-Salt Water, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch61

Author Information

  1. Center for Advanced Friction Studies Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, IL, 62901

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • carbon;
  • agent;
  • microstructure;
  • phenomena

Summary

This paper concentrates on the frictional performance of two commercial carbon–carbon composite materials. “Two–directional” (2D) randomly chopped pitch fiber in charred resin matrix finally densified with smooth laminar CVI and “Three–directional” (3D) non–woven ex–PAN fibers with rough laminar CVI matrix. To evaluate the effect of various contaminants on friction performance, these materials were treated with hydraulic fluid (HF), runway deicer (RDI), aircraft deicer (ADI) and sea–salt water (SW) and their frictional performance was evaluated using a sub–scale aircraft dynamometer. Tests were performed at 50% Relative Humidity (50%RH) and different braking conditions simulating 12.5, 25, 50 and 100% normal landing energy landings (NLE). Pre–exposure of the C/C samples to contaminants significantly influenced the frictional performance when compared to virgin samples (samples without contaminants). When contaminants were present the average coefficient of friction decreased by approximately 30% – 50%. Wear of materials could not be established unambiguously, since several samples exhibited again of mass owing to the strong oxidation processes and the interaction with contaminants. Additional thermal analyses were also performed using thermo–gravimetric analysis (TGA). This analysis indicates that the presence of various contaminants can also affect the kinetics of C/C oxidation. Generally, all studied contaminants accelerate the oxidation rate of C/Cs, and this process begins at significantly lower temperatures.