Chapter 65. Processing and Friction Properties of Intermetallic-Bonded Diamond Ceramtc Composites

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Dale E. Wittmer1,
  2. Sarah Picard1,
  3. Tad Miller1,
  4. Petra Pejcochova2 and
  5. Peter Filip2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch65

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Wittmer, D. E., Picard, S., Miller, T., Pejcochova, P. and Filip, P. (2006) Processing and Friction Properties of Intermetallic-Bonded Diamond Ceramtc Composites, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch65

Author Information

  1. 1

    Southern Illinois University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes Carbondale, IL 62901

  2. 2

    Southern Illinois University. Center for Advanced Friction Studies Carbondale, IL 62901

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • intermetallics;
  • potentially;
  • ceramic;
  • diamond;
  • coefficient

Summary

The innovative use of intermetallics to bond diamonds and ceramics has led to a potentially new friction material. Intermetallics containing Ni and Al have the potential to make a hard, tough bonding phase for ceramic and diamond particulates that increases in strength with temperature. This is the first reported successful introduction of diamonds within a metallic matrix that has been sintered to temperatures exceeding 140O°C without the deterioration and/or decomposition of the diamonds. Intermetallic–bonded diamond (IBD) composites containing 30–60 vol% intermetallic and 70–30 vol% ceramic and diamond were produced by sintering in Ar, vacuum sintering, and hot pressing. DSC was used to identify critical reaction temperatures. Following densification samples were then subjected to friction testing and the friction surface analyzed. Coefficient of friction values of 0.35 to 0.50 were obtained for selected formulations. SEM results confirmed that the diamonds remained at the wear interface and were not pulled out by testing. The processes employed and the results will be presented and discussed.