Chapter 67. Solid-Particle Erosion of MGO and a Hardened MG Alloy

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. K. C. Goretta1,
  2. D. Singh1,
  3. A. J. Cunningham1,
  4. Nan Chen1,
  5. J. L. Routbort1 and
  6. R. G. Rateick Jr.2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch67

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Goretta, K. C., Singh, D., Cunningham, A. J., Chen, N., Routbort, J. L. and Rateick, R. G. (2006) Solid-Particle Erosion of MGO and a Hardened MG Alloy, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch67

Author Information

  1. 1

    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439

  2. 2

    Honeywell, South Bend, IN 46620

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • mgo;
  • oxide;
  • hardening;
  • anodized

Summary

Solid–particle erosion studies were conducted on polycrystalline MgO, a hardened Mg alloy (WE43A–T6), and the same alloy that had been anodized to produce a surface layer of Mg–based oxides. Angular alumina particles of nominal diameter 63 um traveling at 60 rn/s impacted the targets at 20 or 90°. Steady–state erosion rates were determined as weight lost from a sample per weight of impacting particles. Under these conditions, the oxide coating on the WE43A–T6 alloy was removed quickly. The erosion rates of the three base materials were similar for impact at 20°, but the rates of the MgO were substantially higher for impact at normal incidence. The anodized alloy eroded measurably faster than the as–heat–treated alloy. The data and observations by scanning electron microscopy indicated that, for all conditions, the MgO eroded primarily by brittle fracture and the alloys eroded by ductile mechanisms.