Chapter 70. Grindability of TiC–Ni3Al Metal Matrix Composites

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Jun Qu1,
  2. Peter J. Blau1,
  3. James E. Shelton1,
  4. Terry N. Tiegs1 and
  5. T. W. Liao2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch70

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Qu, J., Blau, P. J., Shelton, J. E., Tiegs, T. N. and Liao, T. W. (2008) Grindability of TiC–Ni3Al Metal Matrix Composites, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch70

Author Information

  1. 1

    Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831

  2. 2

    Industrial and Manufacturing Systems Engineering Department, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • grindability;
  • matrix;
  • material removal rate (MRR);
  • diamond;
  • sacrifice

Summary

TiC–Ni3Al metal matrix composites with 40–60 vol% hard phase concentration have been developed as candidate materials for diesel fuel injector plungers. They possess good mechanical properties and similar thermal expansion rate to the steels used for the injector bores. Previous studies have confirmed their high scuffing resistance in fuel–lubricated environment. However, machining of these composites has been quite challenging, especially when high material removal rate (MRR) or precision surface finish are required, due to their relatively high toughness and non–uniform distribution of hard phases in the microstructure. This paper presents a grindability study on TiC(50 vol%)–Ni3Al using different diamond grinding wheels at a variety of grinding conditions. Alumina and silicon nitride were used as baseline materials for comparison. The maximum material removal rate (constrained by machine power) of this composite material was slightly higher for conventional grinding than for creep feed grinding, while much lower compared to alumina in either case. While comparable average surface finish was generated by creep feed and conventional grinding, more severe surface damage was observed for creep feed grinding. The lower abrasive concentration wheel generated lower tangential force and consumed less power, but produced a rougher surface. Lower wheel speed may increase grinding efficiency but would sacrifice the surface finish. A worn–out wheel generally consumes much more grinding power while produces smoother surfaces.