Chapter 71. Microscopic Observations of Sliding Wear Surface of Alumina by Tem

  1. Rajan Tandon,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Yoh-Ichi Kawagoe1,
  2. Tetsuya Senda1,
  3. Kenji Murakami1,
  4. Chiori Takahashi1 and
  5. Koshi Adachi2

Published Online: 27 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch71

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2

How to Cite

Kawagoe, Y.-I., Senda, T., Murakami, K., Takahashi, C. and Adachi, K. (2006) Microscopic Observations of Sliding Wear Surface of Alumina by Tem, in Mechanical Properties and Performance of Engineering Ceramics II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 2 (eds R. Tandon, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291313.ch71

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Maritime Research Institute 6–38–1 Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181–0004, Japan

  2. 2

    Tohoku University 01 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba–ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980–8579, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 27 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080528

Online ISBN: 9780470291313

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Keywords:

  • observations;
  • alumina;
  • sliding;
  • microcracks;
  • tribological

Summary

In a sliding contact between alumina ceramics in atmospheric environment without lubrication, the specific wear rate is significantly low at room temperature. To explore the mechanism of this mild wear of alumina, a series of ball–on–disk sliding wear tests were carried out at various temperatures. TEM observations of the wear surfaces show that a layer of very fine particles (lOnm or less) is formed on the top surface in the mild wear regime, which is identified as a meta–stable phase –alumina. The layer appears to act as a lubrication film at the contact surface to reduce the wear loss. In a severe wear regime above 300 °C, where the wear rate is relatively high, a surface structure consisting of a fine–particle layer and a deformed thin region beneath the layer is observed. Many microcracks exist in the surface structure, which may cause further material removal during a wear test, resulting in a high wear rate.