Chapter 24. Fuel Cell Interconnecting Coatings Produced by Different Thermal Spray Techniques

  1. Narottam P. Bansal,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. E. Garcia and
  2. T. W. Coyle

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291337.ch24

Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 4

Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 4

How to Cite

Garcia, E. and Coyle, T. W. (2006) Fuel Cell Interconnecting Coatings Produced by Different Thermal Spray Techniques, in Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 4 (eds N. P. Bansal, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291337.ch24

Author Information

  1. Centre for Advanced Coating Technologies, University of Toronto 184 College St. Toronto, ON, M5S 3E4

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080542

Online ISBN: 9780470291337

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Keywords:

  • velocity;
  • microscopy;
  • parameters;
  • electrolyte;
  • plasma

Summary

Doped LaCrO3 ceramic material is commonly used to produce interconnect coatings for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Three different thermal spray methods are used in this work to deposit La0.9Sr0.1CrO3 interconnect coatings: high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) using a modified nozzle and two different atmospheric plasma spray (APS) torches. One of them is a commercial torch that uses Ar/H2 as plasma forming gases and the other is a new torch design that uses gas mixtures based in CO2. The spray parameters of each torch were set by studying the in-flight temperature and velocity of the particles as a function of the stand-off distance using a substitute powder (ZrO2-TiO2-Al2O3 composite) with similar physical properties to La0.9Sr0.1CrO3. The process parameters that produced coatings with the lowest porosity were employed to deposit La0.9Sr0.1CrO3 coatings on zirconium oxide substrates. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis techniques were used to characterize the coatings produced by the three different torches. The microstructure features and crystalline phases present in the coatings are explained in terms of the process parameters and correlated with preliminary measurements of electrical resistivity of the as-sprayed coatings. In some cases, post-deposition heat treatments are studied in order to decrease the electrical resistivity.