Chapter 29. Properties of Glass-Ceramic for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

  1. Narottam P. Bansal,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. S. T. Reis1,
  2. R. K. Brow1,
  3. T. Zhang1 and
  4. P. Jasinski1,2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291337.ch29

Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 4

Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 4

How to Cite

Reis, S. T., Brow, R. K., Zhang, T. and Jasinski, P. (2006) Properties of Glass-Ceramic for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, in Advances in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 4 (eds N. P. Bansal, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291337.ch29

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Materials Science & Engineering, University of Missouri-Rolla, Rolla, MO

  2. 2

    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-952 Gdansk, Poland

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080542

Online ISBN: 9780470291337

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Keywords:

  • orthosilicate;
  • thermal;
  • environments;
  • hermetic;
  • platinum

Summary

The thermal stability of ‘invert’ glass-ceramics, based on crystalline pyro- and orthosilicate phases, developed for hermetic seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are described. The effects of long-term (up to 60 days) high temperature (up to 800°C) heat treatments on the properties of the glass-ceramics in oxidizing and reducing environments were evaluated by dilatometric analyses, x-ray diffraction, weight loss measurements, and impedance spectroscopy. The glass-ceramics have thermal expansion coefficients in the range 9.5-11.5 × 10−6/°C and can be sealed to SOFC materials, including Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) and Cr-steel interconnect alloys, at or below 900°C. The thermal expansion characteristics of some glassceramics remain essentially unchanged after >40 days at 800°C, and the glass conductivity at 750°C remains constant (in the range 0.3-1.0 × 10−7 S/cm) in forming gas.