10. Response and Characterization of Confined Borosilicate Glass: Intact and Damaged

  1. Lisa Prokurat,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Kathryn A. Dannemann,
  2. Arthur E. Nicholls,
  3. Charles E. Anderson Jr,
  4. Sidney Chocron and
  5. James D. Walker

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291368.ch10

Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7

How to Cite

Dannemann, K. A., Nicholls, A. E., Anderson, C. E., Chocron, S. and Walker, J. D. (2008) Response and Characterization of Confined Borosilicate Glass: Intact and Damaged, in Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7 (eds L. Prokurat, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291368.ch10

Author Information

  1. Southwest Research Institute P.O. Drawer 28510 San Antonio, Texas 78228-0510

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080573

Online ISBN: 9780470291368

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Keywords:

  • glass material;
  • borosilicate glass;
  • diagnostics;
  • increasing compressive loads;
  • ceramics

Summary

The objective of this work is to determine the fundamental compression response of borosilicate glass and obtain an improved understanding of the transition from intact to damaged material to aid in glass modeling efforts. Compression experiments were conducted on borosilicate glass under confinement. An experimental technique developed for ceramics1 is applied to glass specimens to obtain comminuted glass material by in-situ failure of intact or pre-damaged (by thermal shock) samples. Emphasis is on development of the experimental technique and application of additional diagnostics to characterize the response of comminuted glass. The glass samples (intact or pre-damaged) were inserted in a high-strength steel confining sleeve, and then loaded and re-loaded at quasistatic strain rates to fail the material in-situ. Multiple load/reload cycles were applied at successively increasing compressive loads. Strain gages mounted on the outer diameter of the confinement sleeve were used to measure hoop strain. Differences in the response of intact vs. pre-damaged glass material are evaluated and presented. Interpretation of the results within a constitutive model for borosilicate glass is presented in a companion paper by Chocron, et al.2