14. Relationship of Microstructure and Hardness for A12O3 Armor Materials

  1. Lisa Prokurat,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Memduh Volkan Demirbas1 and
  2. Richard A. Haber2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291368.ch14

Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7

How to Cite

Demirbas, M. V. and Haber, R. A. (2006) Relationship of Microstructure and Hardness for A12O3 Armor Materials, in Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7 (eds L. Prokurat, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291368.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    Rutgers University Ceramic and Materials Engineering 607 Taylor Road Piscataway, NJ 08854

  2. 2

    Rutgers University Ceramic and Materials Engineering 607 Taylor Road Piscataway, NJ 08854

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080573

Online ISBN: 9780470291368

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Keywords:

  • dynamic performance;
  • microstructural;
  • hardness tests;
  • tessellation analysis;
  • geometric construction

Summary

In armor ceramics, it is hard to separate “good” from “bad”, with samples that have close density values. It is still unknown whether a slight change in residual porosity above 99.5%, namely the shape and dispersity of pores are detrimental to the dynamic performance. The method for solving this problem is based on spatial data analysis and subsequent mechanical tests. Three hot-pressed armor grade Al2O3 ceramic tiles were used for this purpose. Microstructural assessment was carried out using nearest neighbor distance distribution functions and tessellation analysis. Hardness tests were performed to assess the properties of the samples. Hardness maps were obtained by indentation of samples 100 times, forming a square array of 10×10 indents and presented as contour maps. The results from microstructural assessment and hardness tests were compared and some degree of correlation was observed between the microstructural analysis and hardness tests.