19. On the Role of Impact Damage in Armor Ceramic Performance

  1. Lisa Prokurat,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Edgar Lara-Curzio
  1. Joseph M. Wells

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291368.ch19

Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7

Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7

How to Cite

Wells, J. M. (2008) On the Role of Impact Damage in Armor Ceramic Performance, in Advances in Ceramic Armor II: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 7 (eds L. Prokurat, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291368.ch19

Author Information

  1. JMW Associates, 102 Pine Hill Blvd, Mashpee, MA 02649-2869 (508) 477-5764

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2006

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080573

Online ISBN: 9780470291368

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Keywords:

  • ballistic performance;
  • ceramics;
  • macro-penetration phenomenon;
  • critical engineering material;
  • phenomenon

Summary

The scientific and engineering prediction of the effective ballistic performance of armor targets is highly desirable to expedite both the development of improved armor ceramics and their incorporation into advanced armor systems. The prediction and assessment of ballistic performance is most often focused on the macro-penetration phenomenon, which is relatively straight forward to observe and measure. Unfortunately, the cognition of the discrete intrinsic material and/or extrinsic target architectural design factors necessary for mitigating and/or controlling the penetration process in notional light-weight passive armor has proven quite elusive. Certainly, it is well known that significant physical damage results from ballistic impact in addition to any projectile penetration. In fact, in armor ceramics, complex internal damage, at both the micro- and the meso/macro-scale, is observed even in the complete absence of any penetration. Furthermore, since such appreciable impact damage occurs prior to the onset of penetration in armor ceramics, the question then needs to be addressed as to what role(s) that existing impact damage would have on the initiation and progression of subsequent penetration. Moreover since the ceramic damage and the penetration processes are both dissipative of kinetic energy transferred from the impacting projectile, the overall ballistic performance of impacted ceramics must be related to both impact damage and penetration. Various issues are raised and discussed relating to the characterization and utilization of actual impact damage in the evaluation of the overall performance of armor ceramics.