1. Nanoparticle Colloidal Suspension Optimization and Freeze-Cast Forming

  1. William M. Mullins,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Egar Lara-Curzio
  1. Kathy Lu and
  2. Chris S. Kessler

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch1

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

How to Cite

Lu, K. and Kessler, C. S. (2007) Nanoparticle Colloidal Suspension Optimization and Freeze-Cast Forming, in Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8 (eds W. M. Mullins, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch1

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 21 IB Holden Hall-M/C 0237 Blacksburg, VA 24061

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080511

Online ISBN: 9780470291375

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Keywords:

  • nanoparticle;
  • suspension;
  • microstructures;
  • flocculation;
  • polymer

Summary

Nanoparticle suspension and forming are important areas. In this paper, the stability and rheology of AI2O3 nanoparticle suspensions at different dispersant concentration, suspension pH, and solids loading were studied. The most desirable suspension conditions were 7.5–9.5 for pH and 2.00–2.25 wt% of Al2O3 for poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) dispersant. 45.0 vol% Al2O3 solids loading can be achieved while maintaining good suspension flow for freeze casting. The maximum solids loading of the Al2O3 nanoparticle suspension was predicted to be 50.7 vol%. The preliminary results of the freeze-east sample showed that suspension pre-rest before freezing was critical for achieving defect free microstructures.