15. Shaping of Bulk Glasses and Ceramics with Nanosized Particles

  1. William M. Mullins,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Egar Lara-Curzio
  1. Jan Tabellion1 and
  2. Rolf Clasen2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch15

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

How to Cite

Tabellion, J. and Clasen, R. (2007) Shaping of Bulk Glasses and Ceramics with Nanosized Particles, in Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8 (eds W. M. Mullins, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Institute of Microsystem Technology Laboratory for Materials Process Technology University of Freiburg Georges-Köhler-Allee 102 D 79110 Freiburg, Germany

  2. 2

    Department of Powder Technology Saarland University, Geb. 43 D 66123 Saarbrtlcken, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080511

Online ISBN: 9780470291375

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Keywords:

  • nanoparticles;
  • parameters;
  • transformations;
  • trophoretically;
  • manufacturing

Summary

Manufacturing of functional ceramics and high-performance glasses by shaping of nano-particles and subsequent sintering combines significant advantages. Due to the high specific surface area of nanoparticles significantly increased sintering activity is achieved, which results in much lower sintering temperature. However, most of the common shaping techniques are not adapted to the intrinsic properties of nano particles. Due to their high specific surface area and low bulk density dry pressing can not provide an economic alternative. Suspension-based techniques seem to be much more promising to achieve green bodies with high density and good homogeneity. Nevertheless, with slip or pressure casting only comparably low compaction rates can be achieved, decreasing with particle size. In contrast, deposition rate is independent of particle size in case of electrophoretic deposition (EPD). Thus, EPD from aqueous suspensions is a fast and economic shaping technique for nanosized particles. A deposition rate of up to 3.5 mm/min was achieved, controlled mainly by the applied electric field strength (typically 1 to 10 V/cm). However, due to the high specific surface area of nano-particles, the density of the electrophoretically deposited green bodies was limited to about 50 %TD. By combining nanosized with larger particles, significantly higher green densities could be reached. From a suspension with optimized properties and adjusted parameters during EPD a green density of up to 81 %TD could be reached, resulting in a strong decrease in sintering shrinkage down to app. 6 %. Samples are shown for silica glasses and zirconia.