4. Nanoparticle Hydroxyapatite Crystallization Control by Using Polyelectrolytes

  1. William M. Mullins,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Egar Lara-Curzio
  1. Mualla Öner and
  2. Özlem Dogan

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch4

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

How to Cite

Öner, M. and Dogan, Ö. (2007) Nanoparticle Hydroxyapatite Crystallization Control by Using Polyelectrolytes, in Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8 (eds W. M. Mullins, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch4

Author Information

  1. Yildiz Technical University Chemical Engineering Department Davutpasa, Istanbul, Turkey 34210

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080511

Online ISBN: 9780470291375

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Keywords:

  • polyelectrolytes;
  • biomaterials;
  • hydroxyapatite;
  • atmospheric;
  • mechanism

Summary

The synthesis of advanced inorganic materials such as biomedical devices, catalysis, ceramics, optical and electronic films require crystallization strategies that provide control over the size, structure, orientation and morphology of the forming crystal. In biomineralization, inorganic crystals form under the full control of structure directing polymers, such as proteins and polysaccharides. In this work we present a facile way to produce HAP nanoparticles by wet chemical synthesis in the presence of polyelectrolytes under strictly controlled temperature, pH, and atmospheric conditions. The constant-composition method has been used to study the influence of polyelectrolytes on the kinetics of crystal growth of hydroxyapatite (HAP) on HAP seed crystals at pH 7.4 and 37 °C. The results indicate that polyelectrolyte concentration and the larger number of negatively charged functional groups markedly affect the growth rate. The fit of the Langmuir adsorption model to the experimental data supports a mechanism of inhibition through molecular adsorption of polymers on the surface of growing crystals.