5. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Silicon Carbide Nanofibers as Composite Reinforcing Materials

  1. William M. Mullins,
  2. Andrew Wereszczak and
  3. Egar Lara-Curzio
  1. Hao Li1,
  2. Abhishek Kothari2 and
  3. Brian W. Sheldon2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch5

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8

How to Cite

Li, H., Kothari, A. and Sheldon, B. W. (2007) Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes and Silicon Carbide Nanofibers as Composite Reinforcing Materials, in Synthesis and Processing of Nanostructured Materials: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 27, Issue 8 (eds W. M. Mullins, A. Wereszczak and E. Lara-Curzio), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470291375.ch5

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering University of Missouri at Columbia Columbia, MO, 65211

  2. 2

    Division of Engineering Brown University Providence, RI 02906

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 2007

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470080511

Online ISBN: 9780470291375

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Keywords:

  • nanocomposite;
  • catalysts;
  • microstructure;
  • graphitic;
  • diameters

Summary

The excellent mechanical properties of nanomaterials are driving research into the creation of strong and tough nanocomposite systems and new forms of nanomaterials. It is critical to select an appropriate reinforcing material with desired microstructures and properties to achieve better nanocomposite performance. The present study focused on synthesis and processing-microstructure relationships of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and SiC nanofibers with chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Various CNTs grown by CVD with anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates were examined with scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM). It was demonstrated that the experimental conditions, especially catalysts and plasma, have significant impact on CNT growth rates and microstructures. Both catalyst and plasma can increase the deposition rate about one order of magnitude. In addition, catalysts promote the secondary growth of CNTs inside the primary CNTs and plasma may improve the stiffness of primary and secondary CNTs. The SiC nanofibers grown by CVD with catalysts were also investigated. SiC diameters match well with the diameters of precursor CNTs, indicating SiC nanofiber size is controlled by the catalysts originated from CNTs. Generally, CNTs fabricated with CVD-template method have disordered graphitic structures and thus have lower tensile strength, but the disordered structures may help for the load transfer between graphitic layers. In the present study, CVD-SiC nanofibers appear to be stiffer than multiwalled CNTs and may also serve as a good candidate for composite reinforcing materials.