Chapter 1. Philosophy, Design, and Performance of Oxy-Fuel Furnaces

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Marvin Gridley

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

How to Cite

Gridley, M. (1997) Philosophy, Design, and Performance of Oxy-Fuel Furnaces, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch1

Author Information

  1. Ball-Foster Glass Container Co., LLC, Muncie, Indiana

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375464

Online ISBN: 9780470294406

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Keywords:

  • operation;
  • furnace;
  • technology;
  • footprint;
  • configuration

Summary

Experience gained with the design and operation of nine oxy-fuel furnaces melting typical container glass compositions over a period up to 4.5 years is discussed. The reasons for conversion to oxy-fuel are environmental benefits in the form of reduced NOx, SOx, and particulate matter emissions; improved energy efficiency and furnace operation; and the ability to achieve increased melting rate with the potential for improved glass quality. However, the design and operation of an oxy furnace depend on the goals of the conversion, and results representing both individual emission tests and routine operation are presented that show that optimum performance in the form of minimal emissions, high energy efficiency, and high melting rate are usually not achieved in a single furnace. Future developments in burner design, an understanding of the mechanisms of exaggerated crown refractory wear, and refinements in furnace design are keys to further improvement in oxy furnaces. Recovery of energy from high-temperature oxy furnace combustion products will be an important factor in the expanded implementation of this technology.