Chapter 11. Glass Furnace NOx Control with Gas Reburn: The Field Test

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Richard Koppang1,
  2. Antonio Marquez1,
  3. David Moyeda1,
  4. Michael Joshi2,
  5. Patrick Mohr2 and
  6. Roger Madrazo3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch11

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

How to Cite

Koppang, R., Marquez, A., Moyeda, D., Joshi, M., Mohr, P. and Madrazo, R. (1997) Glass Furnace NOx Control with Gas Reburn: The Field Test, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch11

Author Information

  1. 1

    Energy and Environmental Research Corporation, Irvine, California

  2. 2

    Combustion Tec Inc., Apopka, Florida

  3. 3

    Anchor Glass Container Corporation, Tampa, Florida

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375464

Online ISBN: 9780470294406

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Keywords:

  • furnaces;
  • economic;
  • combustion;
  • technology;
  • environment

Summary

Glass furnaces are significant emitters of NOx due to their high operating temperatures. The glass industry is faced with progressively more stringent environmental regulations, particularly for NOx, in regions of ozone nonattainment. The overall objective of this development and demonstration program is to commercialize gas reburn technology (GR), previously successfully applied in large boilers and incinerators, to large glass furnaces commonly found in the manufacture of flat, container, and specialty glass. Previous phases of the program have been presented in GRI Topical Reports and at the 1995 Conference on Glass Problems. The technical and economic feasibility has been established through pilot hot firing and cold flow model testing, and preliminary design studies. Highlights of this work are reviewed. This paper focuses primarily on the use of this data to scale the design to a large, sideport regenerative furnace manufacturing container glass. Hardware concepts to implement each of three primary process steps is described: primary combustion with reduced excess O2 operation, port neck gas reburn zone fuel injection and mixing, and regenerator burnout air target wall mounted injection and mixing. A host demonstration site at Anchor Glass Container's Antioch plant was judged to be compatible with the GR process and one furnace has been modified to implement full gas reburning with the objective of demonstrating up to 70% control in the GR operating mode. The test and evaluation phase of the demonstration is being performed in three discrete test blocks: furnace optimization for as-found and gas reburn operation, GR startup through serial commissioning of port pairs, and parametric performance tests at progressively higher gas reburn flows followed by long-term operation at an optimized condition. The results of these tests are also presented.