Chapter 14. Stabilizing Distressed Glass Furnace Melter Crowns

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. Laura A. Lowe1,
  2. John Wosinski2 and
  3. Gene Davis3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch14

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

How to Cite

Lowe, L. A., Wosinski, J. and Davis, G. (1997) Stabilizing Distressed Glass Furnace Melter Crowns, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch14

Author Information

  1. 1

    North American Refractories Co., State College, Pennsylvania

  2. 2

    Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York

  3. 3

    Thomson Consumer Electronics, Circleville, Ohio

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375464

Online ISBN: 9780470294406

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Keywords:

  • temperatures;
  • furnace;
  • equipment;
  • parameters;
  • aluminum

Summary

Higher furnace temperatures and higher pull rates in conventional, air-gas, and oxy-fuel fired glass melting furnaces create difficult operating environments for furnace crowns made of traditional silica or AZS materials. Normal wear is accelerated by a factor of 2–3, threatening to reduce the life of a typical furnace campaign. To lessen the effects of this accelerated wear, several hot repairing methods have been used for obtaining the planned campaign. One of these technologies has been adapted from the steel industry to repair distressed melter crowns by pump-casting Taylor Zircon® 150 Patch. This paper will describe the equipment, installation procedures, expected service parameters, and comments on furnace behavior during installation, including service results after 1–2 years.