Chapter 15. Refractory Corrosion Behavior Under Air-Fuel and Oxy-Fuel Environments

  1. Charles H. Drummond III
  1. H. T. Godard1,
  2. L. H. Kotacska1,
  3. J. F. Wosinski1,
  4. S. M. Winder2,
  5. A. Gupta2,
  6. K. R. Selkregg2 and
  7. S. Gould2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch15

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1

How to Cite

Godard, H. T., Kotacska, L. H., Wosinski, J. F., Winder, S. M., Gupta, A., Selkregg, K. R. and Gould, S. (2008) Refractory Corrosion Behavior Under Air-Fuel and Oxy-Fuel Environments, in A Collection of Papers Presented at the 57th Conference on Glass Problems: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 1 (ed C. H. Drummond), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294406.ch15

Author Information

  1. 1

    Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York

  2. 2

    GRP Incorporated, Falconer, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375464

Online ISBN: 9780470294406

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Keywords:

  • mechanisms;
  • environments;
  • combustion;
  • refractory;
  • thermal

Summary

Various candidate refractories for furnace crown application were independently tested for corrosion resistance under air-fuel and oxy-fuel combustion conditions, both in a laboratory test furnace at GRP Inc. and in a pilot-scale glass melting furnace at Corning Inc. Empirical refractory corrosion results from tests with a wide range of glass compositions are discussed with reference to theoretical behavioral predictions, and corrosion mechanisms are explained. Identical corrosion mechanisms and relative performance behavior of the different refractories were defined in both tests, in agreement with results obtained from testing in industrial glass melting furnaces. In most alkali glass melting environments, fused cast alumina products are found to display maximum stability against corrosion by vapor phase species. Silica refractories, or materials that contain any silicate phases (including AZS products), are found to be thermodynamically unstable under these conditions. This class of refractories displays significantly more corrosion under oxy-fuel combustion than under air-fuel. In particular, fused cast refractories are associated with superior performance due to their low porosity levels in comparison with bonded refractories, fused cast αβ-alumina refractories represent the optimum crown refractory choice, and are preferred over β-alumina products for most crown applications.