Chapter 18. Electrophoretic Deposition of Compacts from Clay Suspensions

  1. Russell K. Wood
  1. I. Hector and
  2. R. Clasen

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294420.ch18

98th Annual Meeting and the Ceramic Manufacturing Council's Workshop and Exposition: Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 2

98th Annual Meeting and the Ceramic Manufacturing Council's Workshop and Exposition: Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 2

How to Cite

Hector, I. and Clasen, R. (1997) Electrophoretic Deposition of Compacts from Clay Suspensions, in 98th Annual Meeting and the Ceramic Manufacturing Council's Workshop and Exposition: Materials & Equipment/Whitewares: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 2 (ed R. K. Wood), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294420.ch18

Author Information

  1. Institut für Neue Materialien gem. GmbH, Saarbrücken, Germany

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375471

Online ISBN: 9780470294420

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Keywords:

  • electrophoretic deposition;
  • electric surfiace charge;
  • diluted suspensions;
  • in contrast to slip casting;
  • deposition rate

Summary

Electrophoretic deposition uses directly the electric surface charge of ceramic particles for forming a compact from diluted suspensions. In contrast to slip casting, the deposition rate of this process is independent of particle size and the thickness of the deposited layer. Therefore, the electrophoretic deposition has a great potential for shaping nanosized powders. In addition to large compacts of any shape, coatings and composites can be produced. Deposition from aqueous suspensions causes problems with the formation of gas bubbles at the electrodes due to the decomposition of water. These bubbles penetrate the deposited compact. This problem can be solved easily by placing a membrane in front of the electrode, which separates the location of gas bubble formation and the deposition of the compact. This method, which has been successfully demonstrated for the deposition of nanosized silica and zirconia powders, was applied to commercial slips for sanitary-ware and stoneware. Very high deposition rates up to 0.15 g/ cm2·s at 35 V/cm were achieved and no phase separation was observed. The experimental results (characterization of the slips, deposited compacts, and the fired bodies) are presented. Finally, the potential of this method for forming complex shapes and gradient structures is discussed.