Chapter 49. Redistribution of Internal Stresses in Composites: An Approach for Increasing the Matrix Cracking Stress

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Edgar Lara-Curzio and
  2. Christiana M. Russ

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch49

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Lara-Curzio, E. and Russ, C. M. (1997) Redistribution of Internal Stresses in Composites: An Approach for Increasing the Matrix Cracking Stress, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch49

Author Information

  1. Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831–6069

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

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Keywords:

  • unidirectional composite;
  • matrix cracking stress;
  • residual stresses;
  • creep behavior;
  • monolithic ceramics

Summary

A concept is proposed to increase the matrix cracking stress of some brittle-matrix composites by taking advantage of the redistribution of internal stresses that occurs when a composite with phases that have dissimilar creep behavior is subjected to thermomechanical loading. The concept is elaborated through the stress analysis of a model unidirectional composite with constituents that exhibit linear viscoelastic behavior. It is shown that when a composite with a matrix that is less creep resistant than the fibers is subjected to a treatment involving both thermal and mechanical loading (e. g., creep test), stresses can be transferred from the matrix to the fibers, resulting in the stress-relaxation of the matrix. It is also shown that at the end of the treatment the matrix can be subjected to compressive residual stresses by the elastic recovery of the fibers, in a process analogous to pre-stressed concrete. The conditions for the viability of this concept are discussed.