Chapter 5. Passivation of Inner Surfaces of Chemical Process Reactor Tubes by Chemical Vapor Deposition

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Terence J. Clark

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch5

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Clark, T. J. (1997) Passivation of Inner Surfaces of Chemical Process Reactor Tubes by Chemical Vapor Deposition, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch5

Author Information

  1. Sarnoff Corporation [formerly David Sarnoff Research Center], SRI Intnl. 201 Washington Road Princeton, New Jersey 08543

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

SEARCH

Keywords:

  • metallic reactor;
  • chemical vapor deposition;
  • passivation;
  • hexamethyldisilazane;
  • crachng conditions

Summary

The inner surface of chemical process, Incoloy metallic reactor tubes subject to coking in industrial service were coated with a thin layer of ceramic material formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A non-oxygen containing organosilicon precursor was introduced in the vapor phase and mixed with either an inert or reducing carrier gas. These atmospheres were utilized to minimize the formation of oxide ceramics. CVD was carried out at atmospheric pressure at 750–950°C. In laboratory scale studies, control of the movement of the maximum deposition zone, within the tube length from inlet to outlet, was developed through adjusting the flow of carrier gas. One silicon compound suitable for the method is hexamethyldisilazane. Coatings made from this precursor were found to be effective in reducing coke by 80% under ethane or butane cracking conditions.