Chapter 54. Numerical Modeling of the Mechanical Response of a Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite in Flexure

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. K. Y. Mark and
  2. M. G. Jenkins

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch54

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Mark, K. Y. and Jenkins, M. G. (1997) Numerical Modeling of the Mechanical Response of a Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite in Flexure, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch54

Author Information

  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Washington Seattle, WA 98195–2600

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

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Keywords:

  • continuous fiber ceramic composite;
  • stress-strain response;
  • compressive loading;
  • statistically-distributed strengths;
  • interphase material

Summary

A numerical model was implemented to predict the mechanical response in the non uniform stress state of flexure for a continuous fiber ceramic composite which exhibited non symmetric stress-strain response for uniform, uniaxial monotonic tensile and compressive loading. The finite element analysis (FEA) model of a prismatic, rectangular beam composed of separately meshed fiber and matrix elements was subjected to four-point flexural loading. A macro code combined with an element “kill” command was used to change the stiffnesses of elements whose statistically-distributed strengths were exceeded by the resulting stresses. Matrix elements were allowed to support unlimited compression. However, unsupported fiber elements (i.e., those coincident with “killed” matrix elements) were not allowed to support compression. Although the model does not directly incorporate the behavior of the interphase material, good agreement between the FEA results and experimental test results was found for a three-dimensionally braided Nicalon™ fiber reinforced β-SiC matrix composite.