Chapter 61. Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. David J. Weinberg1,
  2. Frank K. Myers2 and
  3. John W. Holmes3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch61

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Weinberg, D. J., Myers, F. K. and Holmes, J. W. (1997) Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch61

Author Information

  1. 1

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, Huntington Beach, CA

  2. 2

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, Huntington Beach, CA

  3. 3

    University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

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Keywords:

  • fiber-reinforced ceramics;
  • fatigue testing;
  • optical microscopy;
  • surface coatings;
  • high temperature damage

Summary

This paper presents the results of tensile and flexural thermal-mechanical fatigue testing of SiC/ SiC, C/SiC, and C/C composites. The work is unique in both the number of composite systems studied (seven SiC/SiC, eight C/SiC, and one C/C) and in the very high temperatures used in the experiments (1316°C and 1455°C). The temperature and loading transients used in the experiments were chosen to roughly simulate those expected during re-entry of reusable space vehicles. The partial pressure of oxygen was also varied to simulate a re-entry environment. Some of the failure modes of the composites, many of which had protective surface coatings, were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Many of the C/SiC failures occurred during low temperature (260°C) overloads performed at the end of each TMF cycle. Failure of the SiC/SiC composites was attributed to both high temperature damage (creep and fiber degradation) and low temperature overload stresses.