Chapter 63. The Effect of Neutron Irradiation on Silicon Carbide Fibers

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. G. A. Newsome

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch63

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Newsome, G. A. (1997) The Effect of Neutron Irradiation on Silicon Carbide Fibers, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch63

Author Information

  1. Lockheed Martin Corp, P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, New York 12301

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

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Keywords:

  • commercial fibers;
  • neutron radiation;
  • scanning electron microscopy;
  • radiation experiments;
  • surface roughening

Summary

Nine types of SiC fiber have been exposed to neutron radiation in the Advanced Test Reactor at 250°C for various lengths of time ranging from 83 to 128 days. The effects of these exposures have been initially determined using scanning electron microscopy. The fibers tested were Nicalon™ CG, Tyranno, Hi-Nicalon™, Dow Corning SiC, Carborundum SiC, Textron SCS-6, polymethysilane (PMS) derived SiC from the University of Michigan, and two types of MER SiC fiber. This covers a range of fibers from widely used commercial fibers to developmental fibers. Consistent with previous radiation experiments, Nicalon fiber was severely degraded by the neutron irradiation. Similarly, Tyranno suffered severe degradation. The more advanced fibers which approach the composition and properties of SiC performed well under irradiation. Of these, the Carborundum SiC fiber appeared to perform the best The Hi-Nicalon and Dow Coming fibers exhibited good general stability, but also appear to have some surface roughening. The MER fibers and the Textron SCS-6 fibers both had carbon cores which adversely influenced the overall stability of the fibers.