Chapter 74. High-Temperature Load Transfer in Nicalon/Bmas Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Sujanto Widjaja1,
  2. Karl Jakus1,
  3. John E. Ritter1,
  4. Edgar Lara-Curzio2,
  5. Ellen Y. Sun2,
  6. Thomas R. Watkins2 and
  7. John J. Brennan3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch74

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Widjaja, S., Jakus, K., Ritter, J. E., Lara-Curzio, E., Sun, E. Y., Watkins, T. R. and Brennan, J. J. (1997) High-Temperature Load Transfer in Nicalon/Bmas Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch74

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003

  2. 2

    Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831

  3. 3

    United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT 06108

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

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Keywords:

  • glass-ceramic composites;
  • load transfer;
  • residual stress;
  • direct-contact extensometer;
  • room temperature

Summary

High-temperature load transfer characteristics of Nicalon fiber-reinforced BMAS glass-ceramic composites were studied. Specimens were crept at 1100 °C under constant tensile load to accomplish load transfer from the matrix to the fibers, and then cooled under load. Upon removal of the load at room-temperature, the matrix was put into compression by the elastic recovery of the fibers. This compressive residual stress in the matrix increased the proportional limit of the composite as determined by room-temperature tensile stress-strain behavior. Changes in the state of residual stress in the matrix were also confirmed with X-ray Diffraction measurements (XRD).