Chapter 77. Development of Engineered Inhomogeneities for Mechanical Behavior Studies of Unidirectional CFCMCs

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Todd L. Jessen1,
  2. Victor A. Greenhut2 and
  3. Barry A. Bender1

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch77

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3

How to Cite

Jessen, T. L., Greenhut, V. A. and Bender, B. A. (1997) Development of Engineered Inhomogeneities for Mechanical Behavior Studies of Unidirectional CFCMCs, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures: A: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 3 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294437.ch77

Author Information

  1. 1

    U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375–5343

  2. 2

    Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08855–0909

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375495

Online ISBN: 9780470294437

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Keywords:

  • fiber ceramic matrix composites;
  • mechanical properties;
  • fiber distribution;
  • interfacial issues;
  • thermochemical stability

Summary

Matrix-rich channels (85 m̈m wide) have been shown to significantly influence the mechanical behavior of continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCMC) with nominally homogeneously distributed fibers. The channels are regions relatively free of fibers which develop between fiber tow bundles during processing. This paper details a processing route for generating 'engineered' channels in a 50 volume percent, BN-coated SiC fiber/zirconium titanate CFCMC. This method for generating intentional inhomogeneities in the composite microstructure allows control of both size and location of the channels. Preliminary results indicate that both CFCMC ultimate strength and work-of-fracture decrease with increased channel size for a fixed fiber loading content.