Chapter 10. Characterizing the Performance of Advanced Rolling Element Materials

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. D. J. Mitchell,
  2. R. Sabia,
  3. E. D. Whitney and
  4. J. H. Adair

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch10

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Mitchell, D. J., Sabia, R., Whitney, E. D. and Adair, J. H. (1997) Characterizing the Performance of Advanced Rolling Element Materials, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch10

Author Information

  1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • analyzed;
  • microscopy;
  • profilometry;
  • lubrication;
  • hybrid

Summary

Various methods for the acceleration of Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF) tests of M50 steel and hybrid M50-Si3N4 bearing systems were explored. The acceleration methods investigated were high Hertzian contact stress, roughening or pre-denting the rolling element surface, lubricant contaminated with Arizona Test Dust, lubricant contaminated with fine Al2O3 particles, and thermally degraded lubricant. The advantages and disadvantages of each method were analyzed and compared. Weibull analysis was performed on all-steel and hybrid systems in order to observe how each behaves under the various acceleration conditions. The results of the Weibull analyses will be reported in a subsequent paper. Structural changes were analyzed using conventional techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy and surface profilometry, as well as novel techniques such as atomic force microscopy.