Chapter 12. Synthesis and Microstructure of Powder and Porous ZrO2 from Hydrolysis Process

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Masakuni Ozawa1,
  2. Suguru Suzuki1,
  3. C.-K. Loong2 and
  4. P. Thiyagarajan2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch12

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Ozawa, M., Suzuki, S., Loong, C.-K. and Thiyagarajan, P. (1997) Synthesis and Microstructure of Powder and Porous ZrO2 from Hydrolysis Process, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch12

Author Information

  1. 1

    Nagoya Institute of Technology, Tajimi, Gifu 507, Japan

  2. 2

    Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL60439, USA

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • hydrolysis;
  • agglomeration;
  • hydrolysis;
  • polymerization;
  • microstructure

Summary

Powder and porous ceramics of ZrO2 are useful for starting materials for composites, catalytic supports and absorbates. ZrO2 is, in practice, used as promotor composition in automotive catalyst. Hydrolysis process leads to enhanced control of primary particle size and its dispersion/aggregate state. This study focuses on the crystal structure, microstructure and pore structure in powder and porous ceramics of ZrO2. The agglomeration reaction was controlled by pH in a solution resulting from hydrolysis of aqueous ZrOCl2. We used several characterization methods such as neutron diffraction, small angle neutron scattering, and BET adsorption. The results clarify some factors in the well-controlled processing using hydrolysis for porous ZrO2 ceramics.