Chapter 2. Micro-Gas Turbine Engine Materials and Structures

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. S. M. Spearing and
  2. K. S. Chen

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch2

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Spearing, S. M. and Chen, K. S. (2008) Micro-Gas Turbine Engine Materials and Structures, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch2

Author Information

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • microfabrication;
  • semiconductor materials;
  • turbomachinery;
  • consideration;
  • fabrication

Summary

A program is underway to develop the technology for micro-gas turbine-generators capable of producing 50 W of electrical power in a package less than one cubic centimeter in volume. The initial goal of this project is to produce a turbine generator by micromachining single crystal silicon. The design and fabrication of such a device offers many challenges and opportunities in the field of materials and structures. The major challenges arise from the very high stress levels (∼ 1GPa) required to achieve the necessary turbomachinery performance. The task is complicated by the need to achieve a good structural design within the constraints imposed by microfabrication processes. The major opportunities arise from the use of silicon at very small lengthscales. In particular, the use of microfabrication techniques offers the potential to control the processing-induced flaw size such that very high strengths can be obtained. In this paper the microengine materials and structural design efforts are described, with particular emphasis on the ramifications of the device's small size.