Chapter 21. Micro-Strength Evaluation of Alumina Using Biaxial Flexure Technique

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. A. Okada1,
  2. H. Kawamoto1 and
  3. H. Usami2

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch21

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Okada, A., Kawamoto, H. and Usami, H. (1997) Micro-Strength Evaluation of Alumina Using Biaxial Flexure Technique, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch21

Author Information

  1. 1

    Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya 456 Japan

  2. 2

    Meijo University, Nagoya 468 Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • biaxial strength;
  • dimensions;
  • configuration;
  • miniaturized;
  • initiation

Summary

A fixture for ring-on-ring tests was designed to evaluate biaxial strength of small disc specimens with 3 mm diameter and 0.4 mm thickness. The fixture consists of a separable push rod having a load cell inside, a rod guide and a base support for the discs to be placed on the exact position. Biaxial strength of disc specimens with various dimensions was determined to evaluate the size effect. The results for specimens with 15 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness indicate that the strength decreases with an increase in the inner ring radius in the case of the outer ring diameter of 12 mm. In the tests with inner and outer ring diameters of 2 mm and 12 mm, respectively, the strength was found to be independent of the thickness, suggesting that the effective surface area governs the size effect on strength. This is consistent with calculation of the effective surface area and the volume, based on the radial and tangential stress components. General analysis regarding the size effect on the basis of the flaw distribution is presented.