Chapter 30. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-Cast Ceramic Composites

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. S. L. Dieckman,
  2. K. M. Balss,
  3. J. A. Jendrzejczyk and
  4. A. C. Raptis

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch30

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Dieckman, S. L., Balss, K. M., Jendrzejczyk, J. A. and Raptis, A. C. (2008) Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Gel-Cast Ceramic Composites, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch30

Author Information

  1. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL, 60439, 630–252–5628

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • nondestructive;
  • physical properties;
  • polymerized;
  • monolithic;
  • polymerization

Summary

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are being employed to aid the development of advanced near-net-shape gel-cast ceramic composites. MRI is a unique nondestructive evaluation tool that provides information on both the chemical and physical properties of materials. In this effort, MRI imaging was used to monitor the drying of porous green-state alumina - methacrylamide-N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MAM-MBAM) polymerized composite specimens. MRI was performed on several specimens to study drying as a function of humidity and time. The mass and shrinkage of the specimens were also monitored and correlated with the water content.