Chapter 31. Three New Nondestructive Evaluation Tools Based on High Flux Neutron Sources

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Camden R. Hubbard,
  2. Dudley Raine,
  3. Roberta Peascoe,
  4. Michael Wright,
  5. Paul M. Whaley and
  6. Paul Koehler

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch31

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Hubbard, C. R., Raine, D., Peascoe, R., Wright, M., Whaley, P. M. and Koehler, P. (1997) Three New Nondestructive Evaluation Tools Based on High Flux Neutron Sources, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch31

Author Information

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831–6064 (ph: 423–574 4472

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • attribute;
  • interaction;
  • crystalline;
  • characterization;
  • probability

Summary

Nondestructive evaluation methods and systems based on specific attributes of neutron interactions with materials are being developed. The special attributes of neutrons are low attenuation in most engineering materials, strong interaction with low Z elements, and epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The three methods under development at ORNL include neutron based tomography and radiography; through thickness, nondestructive texture mapping; and internal, noninvasive temperature measurement. All three techniques require high flux sources such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor, a steady state source, or the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, a pulsed neutron source. Neutrons are quite penetrating in most engineering materials and thus can be useful to detect internal flaws and features. Hydrogen atoms, such as in a hydrocarbon fuel, lubricant, or a metal hydride, are relatively opaque to neutron transmission and thus neutron based tomography/radiography is ideal to image their presence. Texture, the nonrandom orientation of crystalline grains within materials, can be mapped nondestructively using neutron diffraction methods. Epithermal neutron resonance absorption is being studied as a noncontacting temperature sensor. This paper highlights the underlying physics of the methods, progress in development, and the potential benefits for science and industry of the three facilities.