Chapter 38. Modeling and Simulation of Failure Processes in Composites

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Jacob Fish,
  2. Kamlun Shek,
  3. Said Gomaa,
  4. Mark S. Shephard,
  5. George J. Dvorak,
  6. William E. Bachrach and
  7. Amr M. Wafa

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch38

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Fish, J., Shek, K., Gomaa, S., Shephard, M. S., Dvorak, G. J., Bachrach, W. E. and Wafa, A. M. (1997) Modeling and Simulation of Failure Processes in Composites, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch38

Author Information

  1. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • heterogeneous;
  • delamination;
  • parameters;
  • integration;
  • computational complexity

Summary

The paper describes recent research conducted at Rensselaer aimed at modeling and simulation of failure processes in composite materials and structures using micromechanical and macromechanical approaches. The micromechanical approach is based on the mathematical homogenization theory with eigenstrains and a rapid post-processing procedure, which enables you to solve large scale structural systems in heterogeneous media at a cost comparable to problems in homogeneous media without significantly compromising on solution accuracy. The building blocks of the macromechanical approach are as follows: (i) enriching through-the-thickness kinematics of the shell to compute 3D effects, (ii) simulation of the delamination growth by incorporating discontinuous through-the-thickness interpolants, (iii) development delamination indicators to predict the critical regions so that enriched shell elements would be used only when and where it is necessary to do so, (iv) use of continuum damage mechanics approach to simulate evolution of delamination growth, and (v) calibration of critical damage parameters at the interface against the fracture toughnesses.