Chapter 39. Dynamic and Transient Characterization of Ceramic Fibers at Elevated Temperatures

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. S. S. Sternstein and
  2. R. Warren

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch39

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Sternstein, S. S. and Warren, R. (1997) Dynamic and Transient Characterization of Ceramic Fibers at Elevated Temperatures, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch39

Author Information

  1. Center for Composite Materials and Structures, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. 12180

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • frequency;
  • elevated;
  • characterizing;
  • dynamic modulus;
  • ceramic

Summary

Ceramic fibers at elevated temperatures exhibit time or frequency dependent mechanical behavior, the most studied of which is creep. Several techniques for characterizing time dependent mechanical properties have been developed in this laboratory. Fibers studied to date include single crystal alumina, YAG, and seven compositions of SiC. Dynamic mechanical spectroscopy methods are used to examine short relaxation time processes associated with periodic deformation phenomena, and provide both dynamic modulus and loss factor versus temperature (to 1600°C) and frequency (from 0.1 to 25 Hz). Pulsed periodic creep and recovery tests are used to examine the longer relaxation time phenomena, and provide an accelerated means to identify and separate anelastic and inelastic creep rates. Taken together these methods provide a comprehensive understanding of the multiplicity of mechanisms and time scales that are relevant to the proper application and design of ceramic fiber reinforced composites.