Chapter 47. Synthesis and Thermal Stability of Nitrogen-Containing Blackglas™ Ceramic

  1. J. P. Singh
  1. Roger Y. Leung1,
  2. Michael Glazier2 and
  3. Mary Ann Meador3

Published Online: 26 MAR 2008

DOI: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch47

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4

How to Cite

Leung, R. Y., Glazier, M. and Meador, M. A. (1997) Synthesis and Thermal Stability of Nitrogen-Containing Blackglas™ Ceramic, in Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference on Composites, Advanced Ceramics, Materials, and Structures - B: Ceramic Engineering and Science Proceedings, Volume 18, Issue 4 (ed J. P. Singh), John Wiley & Sons, Inc., Hoboken, NJ, USA. doi: 10.1002/9780470294444.ch47

Author Information

  1. 1

    Allied Signal Inc., 3500 Garrett Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95054

  2. 2

    Allied Signal Inc., 50 E. Algonquin Rd., Des Plaines, IL 60007

  3. 3

    NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH 44135

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 MAR 2008
  2. Published Print: 1 JAN 1997

ISBN Information

Print ISBN: 9780470375532

Online ISBN: 9780470294444

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Keywords:

  • pyrolysis;
  • atmosphere;
  • oxidation;
  • instability;
  • oxycarbide ceramic

Summary

A nitrogen-containing ceramic is formed from pyrolysis of Blackglas 493 resin in flowing ammonia at temperatures above 900°C. A screening study with a half fraction of 23 design revealed that ammonia pyrolysis atmosphere and oxidation time had a significant influence on distribution of silicon species in the ceramic whereas the effect of pyrolysis temperature between 900-1100°C did not. The nitrogen-containing Blackglas ceramic was found to contain 15-18 wt.% nitrogen and 3 wt.% carbon and was produced with a char yield of 73–76%. 29Si NMR showed the presence of SiO4 and SiNxO1-x species, but no SiC4 species. During oxidation, the percent of silica species in the ceramic produced by ammonia pyrolysis increased at the same rate as that in the Blackglas ceramic pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere.